The Best Way to Dual Boot Linux and Windows: Full Tutorial

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33 thoughts on “The Best Way to Dual Boot Linux and Windows: Full Tutorial

  • August 22, 2018 at 6:05 pm
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    Does it need up messing up your time because when I do it it messes up time in windows and Ubuntu. One used UTC time while the other used real time something. Could someone help me fix this.

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  • August 22, 2018 at 6:05 pm
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    How to install Linux and learn nothing, completely defeating the purpose.

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  • August 22, 2018 at 6:05 pm
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    Hi, interesting video. I personally use a dual boot on a single 120GB SSD with Lubuntu (version "17.whatever"; i always update it i made a script i do it blindly so…) and Win10. Than i recently bought another identical 120GB SSD for storage. Thankfully Lubuntu can read pretty much any kind of file/filesystem, so the second drive is just NTFS.
    I even got a late 2013 iMac that can boot a copy of Lubuntu 16 from an old external sataII drive (via USB 3.0 port). I mean: it is literally faster than the OsX Mavericks or Win10 64bit that are in dual boot on the enterprise hitachi drive inside the iMac. It is a 3Tb mechanical drive, but is quite fast as an hard-drive. I use the external Lubuntu 16 drive to backup my Skyrim SE "universe" directly from the BOOTCAMP partition (yes, i made a bash script even for that, lol). I have managed to play native linux steam games but also wined games so yes: lubuntu/Ubuntu stuff is nice. But for my taste and my low end hardware Lubuntu is amazing.

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  • August 22, 2018 at 6:05 pm
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    This video is kind of outdated… Nobody dual boots anymore… It's all about virtualization… That would have been a way better video.

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  • August 22, 2018 at 6:05 pm
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    "gonne use grub"

    tumbs down mate. just for that alrdy.

    as u saidm using 2 hard drives,
    then simply select wich drive u boot from, skip the loader.

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  • August 22, 2018 at 6:05 pm
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    Be sure to also name each 'drive' so you don't confuse them.

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  • August 22, 2018 at 6:05 pm
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    I've been doing this for a while. Unlike sharing the grub boot loader this method is much safer. Don't cross the streams!

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  • August 22, 2018 at 6:05 pm
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    Hey, will this keep both drives powered in the bakcground anyways or does it just ''turn on'' the drive that you choose in the boot menu??

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  • August 22, 2018 at 6:05 pm
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    Great to see Linux back on Tek Syndicate. I used to do this but I do it slightly differently now. I still have both OS's installed on different SSD's but I allow my PC to boot from the Linux SSD. There I have grub set to find both. This way if grub messes up windows isn't affected, and Linux can be fixed more easily

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  • August 22, 2018 at 6:05 pm
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    This has got to be the most versatile way to dual boot Linux and Windows. Thanks man! I really needed this 🙂

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  • August 22, 2018 at 6:05 pm
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    it would be awesome to program a button in the case itself so you have two power buttons that tell the bios where to go.
    I dont know how feasible or practical it is, but it sounds awesome

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  • August 22, 2018 at 6:05 pm
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    Will the other drives be tied to either Windows or Linux, or would they have to be programmed to work with either of the operating systems?

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  • August 22, 2018 at 6:05 pm
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    Not to be a complete nerd on you, but you do need grub to boot Linux. Its function is much more than to select the OS, it loads the kernel into memory and "bootstarps" the OS. Without a Bootloader there is no OS. What you are seeing in Logan's setup is a default behavior of Ubuntu to keep the grub menu hidden if it doesn't detect a secondary OS, and use the default boot option every time. After doing updates, grub might update itself and detect windows, it will show the menu then. you will have to go to grub configuration and make it hidden again. I prefer to use grub to select between windows and Linux, but that's just me.

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  • August 22, 2018 at 6:05 pm
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    Wow thanks Logan ……Now I can have my cake and eat it. I know now how I'm going to have my new PC.

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  • August 22, 2018 at 6:05 pm
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    a problem you may run into is that most linux distros use and sync the bios hardwareclock to utc, while windows syncs the hardware clock to local time by default

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  • August 22, 2018 at 6:05 pm
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    Similar to the way I dual boot on my desktop, Two separate drives, Had Linux installed on one, Then installed Win10 on the other, I then use Grub on my Linux drive to boot to my Windows drive. Much simpler and less faffing about than the way you did it in my opinion, Never had a issue with either OS affecting the other either.

    If your doing it from scratch, I don't see the issue of just having both drives connected, Install Windows first on one drive, Then install Linux on the other, (Grub will generally auto detect the Windows install and add a entry for it.) Then put your Linux drive as the first drive in the boot order. That way you can use Grub without it even touching your Windows drive.

    Also probably not a great idea to format a USB flash drive to NTFS as the benefits of NTFS aren't really needed on a flash drive and it can cause extra unneeded writes to it. Best to just stick with FAT32 for flash drives to be honest.

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  • August 22, 2018 at 6:05 pm
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    Videos like this are much better than the dogshit gaming headset videos you guys have been making lately.

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  • August 22, 2018 at 6:05 pm
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    Why would you need to remove the drive before installing on another drive?

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  • August 22, 2018 at 6:05 pm
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    Great stuff, exactly the way I set up multi boot systems, much better than using a boot loader like Lilo or Grub etc.

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  • August 22, 2018 at 6:05 pm
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    What if you only have one drive? Can't you just split the volume and install Linux that way? Or does the split volume need to be assigned as C:?

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  • August 22, 2018 at 6:05 pm
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    What also works other than plugging in the Linux drive later is to disable it in BIOS before anything.
    That's how I did it.

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  • August 22, 2018 at 6:05 pm
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    The last time I installed a dual boot system you could just use the NT bootloader rather than mess around with LILO or GRUB.

    I've since decided that dual boot systems aren't worth the hassle. Apart from a hobbyist playing around I don't see any use case for it that can't be filled by running the secondary OS in a VM.

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  • August 22, 2018 at 6:05 pm
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    I used Linux once to hot flash a BIOS that was messed up when Windows wouldn't let me do anything. Aside from that I don't get the appeal. Kind of a pain in the ass, and most things are built for Windows. Ironically it's kinda like owning a Windows phone in 2018.

    Reply

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