Valve Proton — Play Windows Games On Linux From Steam!

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Valve just updated Steam Play with a new technology called Proton, which is a custom implementation of WINE, for running Windows games on Linux (and …

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39 thoughts on “Valve Proton — Play Windows Games On Linux From Steam!

  • August 26, 2018 at 11:59 am
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    Well I stopped using Windows for gaming when I started using Linux in 1997. I'm not the only one to have stayed on consoles since then. I'll go back to gaming on PC's when games are for Linux. There are plenty of people out there just like me.

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  • August 26, 2018 at 11:59 am
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    This is not even going to dent WIndows market share, maybe scratch the paint a bit. The whole thing is designed to make noise and drive the 'Windows is evil' bullshit mantra. Linux market share is in sub 0.3% share and it will not in anyway move developers to consider Linux as a native support OS. It's all meant for Valve to get your money with the ever present excuse that this is a compatibility layer if performance is hit. If you are serious about gaming and interested in gaming you get a Windows based system to run these games. Get your heads out of the sand and stop the BS SJW-esq excuses. Linux will never (as in not ever) get anywhere in this field for the very simple reason there's no revenue to be made by supporting Linux and the amount of work it would take to do so will make this a loss every time.

    The excuse that this 'will increase the number of registered Linux purchases' is laughable because even if this would increase these numbers by 1000% it's still low single digit share on steam and remains a blip in overall OS market share. Linux is to WIndows what Windows Mobile was to Android, it's irrelevant no matter how good it may or may not be.

    Support for Linux is not and will never be a viable commercial option for most software developers. Some will maybe offer it as a pet project or as a marketing/PR tool.

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  • August 26, 2018 at 11:59 am
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    Me personally as a developer am thinking with something like this I should focus less on supporting windows instead of Linux as a lot of windows api for gaming is bloated or crap… Linux native graphic end is gl which is cleaner and Linux has always been great at supporting rediculous amounts of choices which Microsoft strongly discourages with their platform. If more people can get into Linux because of this I should ignore windows entirely to give even more reason for people to get onto Linux so eventually this wouldn't even be needed and the worlds (advertisement city – the os) can die.

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  • August 26, 2018 at 11:59 am
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    Mac compatibility issue is mainly Vulkan integration issue with OSX … thanks to apple to letting down opengl , vulkan and doing their own graphics API

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  • August 26, 2018 at 11:59 am
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    I bet the small list of titles is just the games that the people working on it are playing.

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  • August 26, 2018 at 11:59 am
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    I'm building my new PC soon. And honestly, I would go with Windows still until theres more games that are compatible

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  • August 26, 2018 at 11:59 am
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    I'm using SteamPlay , Fallout NV , Crysis 1 , Doom 2016 , Tropico 4 worked so far. Gta Vice City didn't work.

    So far so good. I was already playing GTA 5 , Assasins Creed 1 and Witcher 3 via DXVK before Proton came out. Proton is somewhat different from Wine because Wine aims a creating a Windows environment by all means but Proton is only aims for gaming.

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  • August 26, 2018 at 11:59 am
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    Last month people jeer on Steam for accepting spyware and malware.
    This time… Almost nobody broadcast this news…
    Where is the media positivity nowadays?

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  • August 26, 2018 at 11:59 am
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    I think Apple's removal of the Steam Link app from the app store makes Valve not very motivated to bring it to macOS.

    As for development in general for linux: I think everyone that would have built for linux before will still build for linux. Why? Because they mostly use engines that support exporting to linux out of the box. And why wouldn't I get gamers the best experience for half a day of compiling?

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  • August 26, 2018 at 11:59 am
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    I'm a Linux gamer and very happy with this new Proton thing

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  • August 26, 2018 at 11:59 am
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    This will be intresting to see, to me the first port of call is to get gamers to use Linux and for that, games need to work on it, I've heard of many gamers that say they would use Linux if they could play thier windows games, if this works really well, it could do that.

    With that, developers would be more likely to target Linux either directly or doing it using this process whiles the game is designed to work well with it so the performance hit is almost nothing on Linux.

    In any case, thier is no reason for developers to not try and get thier windows games to work with this, it would open up another market to them with very little cost to them and that will likely mean more games sales.

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  • August 26, 2018 at 11:59 am
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    I'd like a distro where I could do the KVM thingy natively

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  • August 26, 2018 at 11:59 am
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    If this ever gets really polished, I'll drop Windows like a bad habit. I hate it.

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  • August 26, 2018 at 11:59 am
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    Linux gamer, super super exicited. Nothing works atm. Maybe because I'm using the flatpak version of steam. Not sure. At least somebody is working on it, so the future is looking very bright. You rock valve.

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  • August 26, 2018 at 11:59 am
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    As far as I can tell they’re trying to push for cloud gaming. Linux is MUCH easier to provision cloud services from so with the combination of steam link and proton they’re in a good position to build it out. And though it might reduce support for native Linux compilations if market share goes up as a result for Linux then I think the opposite will happen.

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  • August 26, 2018 at 11:59 am
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    This is huge! For 18 years I've been using Linux and have been forced to keep a windows dual boot just for games. The past few years more and more games have come to Linux but it would be great to ditch windows once and for all.

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  • August 26, 2018 at 11:59 am
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    Valve is not hiding that they don't give a f about mac (it's to closed – there is no volcan for mac also, but i'm not sure about this one), and that they really don't like windows. For me it's perfect. I'm testing beta now. It's freaking awesome. Many games still don't work (but with windows architecture and shitload of drm is what we can expect), but this supported ones are working like charm. For me performance is not an issue. They have about 5% loss, so still way above 60fps…

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  • August 26, 2018 at 11:59 am
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    The primary thing needed is pulling people to Linux, developers will eventually support it more later down the line. But probably more so with OGL and Vulkan to cover all platforms.

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  • August 26, 2018 at 11:59 am
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    As a Linux user and budding developer, this is super exciting to me (:

    Glad you "humoured" the compatibility definition, as the whole "emulator" contention has been floating around slightly more since Proton launched. It's the equivalent of calling Mono a dotNET emulator. Clearly it's not it's a re-implementation of the API and feature-set. Wine/Proton is very much the same. calling it an emulator is very much a false statement. You aren't emulating hardware, or anything per se, you're just re-directing calls and providing a FOSS implementation of proprietary runtimes and APIs when required. And even then it doesn't even re-implement that much iin the grand scheme, you still run MSVC runtimes and most any windows core DLL natively. Just the low level kernel calls are redirected to host OS equivalants. A VM is far more analogous to an emulator in many respects.

    The biggest advice from both valve and more broadly when it comes to making the best Proton compatible game shipping on Windows, it's to use POSIX (Yes the Windows kernel supports Posix) And Vulkan (: Something Oxide games alluded to doing, to paraphrase "Linux is a far more neutral development platform to start from for cross-platform development" the sooner people realise this the better we'll be. A large swath especially AAA games are already shipped with proprietary wrappers, so the argument for native releases is a minefield already, eON, Feral, Aspyr etc If anything you might worry more about them.

    It might hurt Linux short-term, but as highlighted in the video, increasing the marketshare will have a far more substantial effect. We already have 3000+ Native games on Steam, that still hasn't swayed hundreds of developers, including some indies.

    Personally I'm getting better performance in DOOM 2016 Vulkan on my RX 570 running Mesa than with latest Wine. and Compute shaders work within Proton without a hitch (or tedious configuration).

    Valve responded to Liam Dawe (editor in-chief at GamingOnLinux) saying Proton purchases, installs and playtime is tracked explicitly as Linux. So I'm going to be optimistic. And even as someone who ditched Windows on my daily driver completely upon building my Ryzen 2700X system, and who goes the hurdles to run Wine+DXVK for awhile now, having a updated maintained and custom patched rolling wine release built directly into Steam, instead of having to manage it all manually. It's a benefit to even myself.

    Some of the nitty gritty not covered in any of the steamcommunity post, each game sym links to a master wine prefix to avoid wasting storage on the core prefix setup, but generates a segregated sub-prefix for each game (any files added to this prefix directory will override the defaults), so all user/app data/Saved Games style files are now stored in "<steamlibrary>/steamapps/compatdata/<AppID>/pfx/ " that's the equavalant of the C:/ as far as the game is concerned, this is security conscious and won't clutter your home/user/ directory. Also windows title bars in proton show <plain text windows title>(AppID) so it's even faster and easier to figure out the AppID of the game running, if you need to pop into the save/config files for any reason. The whitelist seems to also have scripts that trigger the equivalent of winetricks verbs, and it also installs anything in the _CommonRedist folder from the windows depot.

    Quite impressed so far, and can only see it as a good thing going forward, especially making Linux users using Wine/Proton a transparent figure that developers can see, as previously they counted as Windows users. (:

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  • August 26, 2018 at 11:59 am
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    Nintendo strikes down Roms… Linux will soon now be able to play all games… I can't take this up and down with my heart…

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  • August 26, 2018 at 11:59 am
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    The end game is probably to create a competetive competing OS for gaming. To enable the possibility of something like a SteamBox actually becoming successful. (Although I doubt they care about the steambox itself). They just want to enable the possibility for competition. It works as a threat to make sure Microsoft don't mess with their steam software on their OS, so they can continue to be the leading digital game distributor on desktop and laptop computers.

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  • August 26, 2018 at 11:59 am
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    Short term I believe that some new games that may had a chance to have linux version aren't going to get it if they work with Proton. I guess this both is and isn't a problem. If it works nice with Proton then why wait for a potentially bad Linux version?
    In the long term people who dual boot just for games will at last be able to free up some space on their drives by deleting Windows and if we are lucky we will start seeing the linux marketshare to grow in a couple of years.

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  • August 26, 2018 at 11:59 am
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    Its a shame that Valve decided to call it Proton, I mean they always sticked to there Steam Machine Stuff Naming Scheme. Why dont call Proton Turbine or something. 😀

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