Windows Games on Linux | All you need to know

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If you are going to play Windows games on Linux this is all you need to know. I go over the main aspects of creating a wonderful experience. Part 1: The Types …
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27 thoughts on “Windows Games on Linux | All you need to know

  • January 3, 2019 at 3:35 pm
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    I just use Q4Wine to build separate build areas and install directly into WINE. So far it's working well. None of the huge overhead of multiple WINE installations, just variations on the WINEARCH, WINEPREFIX environment variables.

    Battle.net works raw, World of Warcraft too.. I'm surprised on the compatibility level, no disabling features or mapping native API calls. It just works.

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  • January 3, 2019 at 3:35 pm
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    The AMD card doesn't even have to be that recent for kernel driver support… my aging Radeon 7970HD still works perfectly out of the box, even when connected through a Thunderbolt 3 eGPU case on my laptop. Proton definitely did kill my need to dual boot. I still run a virtualized Windows 10 for those handful of games I own from different distribution platforms like Origin that just don't play friendly with Linux. VMWare is pretty good for that, if it's the rabbit hole you want to go down, but most of my games library is Steam, and Linux native at that – it's been my daily driver/main system of choice for over a decade.

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  • January 3, 2019 at 3:35 pm
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    I think there are some miss conceptions that you may want to clarify:

    1 – AMD supports and develops the open source driver "amdgpu" on the kernel since 2015-2016 . This driver officially supports GCN 1.2 – Vega archs and "non-oficially" GCN 1.0-1.1 (i.e. HD7950 and up). This means that AMD fully disclosures how to access the internal functions of their GPUs. Meanwhile, on Nvidia side, the Kernel driver is closed source and is shipped within other libraries (more about this in the next point)

    2 – AMDGPU-PRO is just the proprietary implementation for OpenGL, Vulkan, OpenCL and Video aceleration. If you're not a developer is kinda difficult to explain the difference between a driver and an API implementation (and harder for people coming from Windows), but you can see then as Windows parallels for Direct X 9-10-11 (OpenGL) and Direct X 12 (Vulkan). There also exist Open Source implementations of this APIs known as Mesa.

    3 – The big deal about the open source kernel drivers is that this allows to have an open source implementation of the APIs (like Mesa) that can actually achieve the same performance (or a better one) as with the proprietary implementation. Not to mention that it also opens the door in order to use AMD GPUs outside of the x86 ecosystem (if you have the code, you can find the way to make it work anywhere).

    4 – DXVK is an implementation of Direct X 10/11 over Vulkan and it's shipped with Proton when you install Steam on Linux. The big deal of this is that Vulkan is low level API, so it allows to create a more performant implementation that when using a high level api like OpenGL. Long story short: DXVK allows to run DX games faster on wine/proton, getting a performance quite close to the one you get on those games on Windows.

    Hope my points clarify a little bit the concepts! By the way, nice video and hope you enjoy your gaming experience on Linux!

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  • January 3, 2019 at 3:35 pm
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    Yes! Exiting video and news, and one I been waiting for. I have been impressed with latest AMD chips and even the GPU'S, whilst not quite as good or thermally efficient as Nvidia, I am sure will be more than enough for my wishes.
    My only small area of concern, is I like using Nexus Mods website, along with mod managers like Mod Organizer, which at the moment probably won't work on Linux I am guessing. Still, I am chuffed that I will be able to play my old Skyrim and Dishonoured, etc and I am fairly sure there is a Linux based viewer for Second Life, which I also mooch about in.

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  • January 3, 2019 at 3:35 pm
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    Thanks for this on behalf of the Linux enthusiasts.
    For my usage, it's not quite where I need it to be yet. Proton is the first game changer, but it's development seems somewhat slow for now.

    Hopefully during the course of 2019 I won't have any excuse not to install my Arch with my prepared dotfiles on bare metal anymore. I'm not as confident as you are, I'd say 2020 or even 2021, but I might be wrong.

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  • January 3, 2019 at 3:35 pm
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    Excellent encouraging and inspirational video. My mantra or credo so to speak is "Linux is Life, have you started living yet?" I am so thankful to have this "choice" in today's world of proprietary greed. It has brought so much independence and desperately needed freedom back to the tech world. I am very optimistic about the future of the desktop too!

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  • January 3, 2019 at 3:35 pm
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    HI the one thing that stopped me get rid of windows, was gaming just two, and I have always had windows 10, and Linux Manjaro side by side, that is till last week when found out about Lutris, then that was final nail in the coffin for my windows, I am running an HP Compaq Notebook 6710b 2 GB Ram 60GB Hard Drive, And I was able to use Hiri email client, for my email for work to replace outlook.

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  • January 3, 2019 at 3:35 pm
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    I am also excited for what Linux holds for the coming years now having switched completely over from Windows. I do wonder where MS is heading Windows now. Their business model going forward to make the OS profitable. One could easily see a nice revenue stream from it after becoming a subscription based service the same as office and 365. Office 2019 will be the last stand alone I believe. Most users can still use their old W7,8 keys to use the latest W10 so MS has not been selling W10 to most existing users for a while now. At what percentage of users on W10 will MS start to transition it to subscription? Maybe this is when we see a large transition to Linux along with no more support for W7. Gaming is of huge importance to a lot of PC users and if Linux through OSS can get greater support from AMD & Intel this will also boost numbers. Privacy issues is also a major concern for me and what companies like MS, Google etc are doing with the information they collect. One piece of tech that could also suddenly endorse Linux is the mobile phone space. With Intel releasing x86 chips this year to be used in mobiles will we see these new phones then easily being ported to running your favourite Linux distro? I would be excited to update my mobile to one able to run a customized Linux.

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  • January 3, 2019 at 3:35 pm
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    @1:00 The Long Dark runs native on Linux.
    @2:42 I finally managed to manually setup a 32bit Wineprefix, install librarie and ran it using bash. In the end, the program still does not run properly.
    @2:57 Unless you want to use a save game editor for a game that requires 4.5 .NET libraries and a 32bit Wine prefix. 😉

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  • January 3, 2019 at 3:35 pm
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    10:09 "if you watch it today… January second or third"
    I feel you…

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  • January 3, 2019 at 3:35 pm
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    Fewer folks buy a matched set of current market GPUs for gaming,
    but TONS of gamers still have a gpu they got 2-3 years ago that they 'replaced' with a new gaming gpu.

    I'm still waiting for them to go back to Plank cpus, so an APU could have 1-2gb vram fast channeled to APU 'on plank' akin to OnDie

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  • January 3, 2019 at 3:35 pm
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    Awesome video. Some remarks:

    0:55 – not "Native steam games" but simply native games. Steam is only one option you can buy them from. I know it was probably just a slip of a tongue, but I want to write it for the Linux newbies, so they know what options they have when buying native Linux games: Steam, GoG, Humble Store, Itch.io. There are also some great free Open Source games like 0.A.D. you can get direcly from repositories (Software center).

    2:04 – Aside from running wine scripts, Lutris is also a great software to integrate all your games into one Library. Example: you are in Steam and you remember you want to play certain game, but can't see it anywhere. Then you realize you bought it at GoG. So have to head to a directory where you installed it and run it from there. With Lutris, you can have all your games from different sources in one place.

    10:23 No, you don't ever want to head directly to nvidia site:

    12:50 I might be wrong here, but I don't remember ever manually installing dependencies for OpenGL or Vulkan, or anything for DXVK on my Antergos distro. Either it was there, or it is part of dependencies for nvidia.

    P.S. I don't recommend dual booting with Windows on the same hard drive, especially Windows 10 tends to wipe out the Linux partition from GRUB during updates and you would have to repair GRUB in order to run it again. If you decide to do it anyway, make sure to install Windows first and Linux second, because Windows does this also during installation.

    And lastly, I very much recommend the website GamingOnLinux to everyone who is into well.. gaming on Linux 😉 It has great and friendly stuff, community, you'll get all the relevant news and often you will even find solutions for game run related problems in articles or comments.

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  • January 3, 2019 at 3:35 pm
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    I want to give your video a hundred likes. But sadly that's not possible. Thanks for making this amazing video.

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  • January 3, 2019 at 3:35 pm
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    Was using kvms with PCI passthru to do crypto mining in virtual machines with boot isolated cpu cores
    so I could play games on host gpu, cpus, and ram unmolested by the miners,
    without exposing main computer to the OS of the miners (for security)

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  • January 3, 2019 at 3:35 pm
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    I like your optimism on that subject.
    My plans for 2019 are actually to get either a 580, Vega or potentially Navi even after rolling for years with nVidia, won't sell those though because I want to try GPU passthrough at some point.

    By the way, have you taken note of that Intel graphics thing that's on Github and made for Steam on Linux in mind?

    My guess is they are preparing for Arctic Sound and going FOSS is a good start.

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  • January 3, 2019 at 3:35 pm
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    As Ron Paul once said " you CANNOT stop an idea who's time has come"… It is TIME for Linux desktops to roll full "steam" ahead baby!! #winblows…you're FIRED!

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  • January 3, 2019 at 3:35 pm
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    thanks for the great videos, your a machine with the amount of content your pushing out! I for one would love to see the looking glass tutorial BTW.

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  • January 3, 2019 at 3:35 pm
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    Looking glass is all about not having to switch or needing a secondary monitor. Maybe I heard you wrong?
    Anyway, it would actually be interesting to get a guide to set it up, that is more explanatory than what you usually find out there.

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  • January 3, 2019 at 3:35 pm
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    For Ubuntu based machines, Mint, ElementaryOS etc. Using Nvidia cards.

    Unlike in Windows you don't go to the Nvidia website download and install the drivers. ( This is frowned upon in Linux ). You add the "PPA" for Nvidia to your system.. for the sake of example a PPA is a direct link, managed by the vendor of your distribution, to the Nvidia driver server. ( not quite that, but you get the idea ). Because you've added the PPA your system will automatically find the best driver for your machine and its hardware and then offer the appropriate driver to install using the inbuilt driver manager program. Simply click install then re-boot your machine. Because you've added the PPA once a new driver has been released and approved for your system it will appear in the driver manager to install, keeping you up to date. Cool, eh? No more going to the website and spending hours finding the right driver to download… and no additional bloatware running in the background slowing your PC and game performance either!

    To install a PPA you can use one of two methods. Under, usually administration, you'll find "software sources". Locate the section "PPA's" then click the add button, copy paste the PPA there.. or

    In Terminal ( it's the easy method )

    sudo add-apt-repository ppa:graphics-drivers/ppa

    ..and that's it, a one time deal, done.

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  • January 3, 2019 at 3:35 pm
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    Great video and really helpful 🙂 keep i up great master, show us the light 😀

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  • January 3, 2019 at 3:35 pm
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    i went to an rx 580 due to how great the open source drivers are,sorry but my gtx 970 was worse for me than my rx 580 is.

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  • January 3, 2019 at 3:35 pm
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    I just hope that Resident Evil 2 Remake will be playable on Linux, because I have bought it, and Linux(Ubuntu18.10) is the only OS on my PC. The open source driver was the reason for me to buy AMD RX460 last year, and I will buy RX570 or RX580 when the game is released.

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